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Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Home Loan Banks (FHLBs) are government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) that help bring capital to the housing markets. Their regulator is the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA).

 

HFAs and the Housing GSEs
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac purchase and securitize loans from HFAs and other lenders who then use the proceeds to finance more mortgages. The FHLBs provide advances and other financial products to support their members’ affordable housing activities. The GSEs are critical in providing liquidity, stability and affordability to the mortgage market, particularly for long-term, fixed-rate mortgages. Until recent years, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were large purchasers of Housing Bonds and Housing Credits.

GSE Reform

Recently, Congress has begun to consider comprehensive reform legislation, particularly Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. NCSHA supports a strong, healthy GSE system in order to ensure stability, liquidity, and affordability in the home mortgage market. NCSHA's position paper on GSE reform calls for a for a system with an explicit goverment guarantee, robust affordable housing goals, and a clear commitment to partnering with HFAs.

Useful Links: Federal Housing Finance Agency, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, U.S. Federal Home Loan Bank System

NCSHA Blog Posts

  • May 5, 2016
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    The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) announced on Wednesday that it has increased Fannie Mae's and Freddie Mac's 2016 multifamily lending caps from $31 billion to $35 billion, effective immediately.

  • April 25, 2016
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    On April 20, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) held a roundtable with leading affordable housing, consumer protection, civil rights, and environmental organizations to solicit their input on FHFA’s proposed “Duty to Serve” rule. NCSHA was represented at the roundtable by Minnesota Housing Commissioner and NCSHA Board member Mary Tingerthal. Other participants included representatives from Enterprise Community Partners, Center for American Progress, National Housing Conference, National Housing Trust, National Low Income Housing Coalition, Poverty & Race Research Action Council, Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights, National Fair Housing Alliance, and NeighborWorks America. NCSHA staff accompanied Mary to the roundtable.

    News

    • August 2, 2012
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      The funding comes by way of the AG’s office from the National Mortgage Settlement. It was given to the Tennessee Housing Development Agency to administer. THDA officials say the application process will be similar to that of the Hardest Hit Fund, which helps homeowners on the brink of foreclosure.

    • April 30, 2010
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      The Ohio Housing Finance Agency (OHFA) recently issued $5.6 million of tax exempt bonds on behalf of New Hampshire House Associates, LLC. The proceeds of the bonds will be used to finance the acquisition and rehabilitation of a multifamily residential rental facility in Warren, Ohio.

      Government Sponsored Enterprises (GSEs) - Resources

      • May 16, 2016

        One telling indicator of the state of the nation’s housing is the drop in the homeownership rate to just 64.5 percent last year, erasing nearly all of the increase in the previous two decades. The number of homeowners fell for the eighth straight year, signaling persistently weak demand in this key market segment. And the trend does not appear to be abating, with the national homeownership rate down to 63.7 percent in the first quarter of 2015.

      • May 16, 2016

        The decade-long surge in rental demand is unprecedented. In mid-2015, 43 million families and individuals lived in rental housing, up nearly 9 million from 2005—the largest gain in any 10-year period on record. In addition, the share of all US households that rent rose from 31 percent to 37 percent, its highest level since the mid-1960s.