elderly4.jpg

State HFAs and their partners provide affordable housing for elderly persons through the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly program, the Section 8 program, and other affordable housing programs.

Under the Section 202 program, HUD provides capital advances to finance the construction, rehabilitation, or acquisition with or without rehabilitation of structures that will serve as supportive housing for very low-income elderly persons, including the frail elderly, and provides rent subsidies for the projects to help make them affordable. In addition, HFAs provide home equity conversion mortgages (HECM), an FHA-insured reverse mortgage, allowing seniors (62 and over) to access the equity in their home.

Useful Link: HUD's Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program Webpage

NCSHA Blog Posts

  • June 9, 2016
    House of Representatives.gif

    On June 7, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-OH) released an anti-poverty plan from the Republican Task Force on Poverty, Opportunity, and Upward Mobility (Task Force). This set of proposals is part of a larger agenda entitled A Better Way: Our Vision for a Confident America that Ryan and other Republican leaders hope will provide a blueprint for what they can accomplish under a Republican president.

  • June 9, 2016
    House of Representatives.gif

    On May 26, Representative Jim Jordan (R-OH), chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, introduced H.R. 5360, the Welfare Reform and Upward Mobility Act, which would prohibit Congress from funding means-tested housing programs and in their place create a single state block grant for housing activities.

    News

    Elderly Housing - Resources

    • May 16, 2016

      The decade-long surge in rental demand is unprecedented. In mid-2015, 43 million families and individuals lived in rental housing, up nearly 9 million from 2005—the largest gain in any 10-year period on record. In addition, the share of all US households that rent rose from 31 percent to 37 percent, its highest level since the mid-1960s.

    • May 16, 2016

      The data in Out of Reach is sobering. In my home state of Oregon, and in communities across the country, working families searching for affordable rental units find little to nothing in their price range. There simply isn’t enough reasonably priced, decently maintained housing to meet the demand, and rapidly rising rents outpace wages. As a result, one out of four households spends more than half their income on housing costs. People with low or fixed incomes face even bleaker situations